About Us

 

Brad Gibbs C Ped (C ), HBSc (Kin.)

 


Brad Gibbs has been providing custom foot orthoses (Orthotics) and high quality pedorthic services since 1988.
As a Canadian Certified Pedorthist, Brad is an expert in lower limb biomechanics, and the design, manufacture and fit of custom foot orthoses (orthotics), footwear and footwear modifications.


Brad is a human movement professional. With a Bachelor of Science degree in Honours Kinesiology (University of Waterloo), Brad has an extensive understanding of the biomechanics and anatomy of the human body and the factors that affect human locomotion (how we walk).


In 1990, Ortho-Kinetics Inc. was established in Cambridge Ontario and has developed a strong and effective partnership with physicians and allied healthcare professionals to provide excellent service, products and advice to improve the health and lifestyle of the people in the community.


In 1995, Brad established a satellite clinic in Oakville, working with family physicians and orthopaedic surgeons. Since 1998 he has partnered with Oakville Sports Medicine Centre in providing comprehensive and complementary healthcare services to the Oakville community.


In 2008,. Brad became a member of the Board of Directors of the Pedorthic Association of Canada. He served 5 years on the board, helping to enhance the reputation of Canadian Pedorthics to the healthcare insurance industry and to the international orthopaedic community. From 2011 to 2012, Brad was the President of the Pedorthic Association of Canada.  

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Krulicki, C. Ped ( C) , B.A. (Kin)

 

Jennifer is native to Kitchener-Waterloo. She has been practicing Pedorthics in the K-W and surrounding areas over the past 8 years. Jennifer graduated from Wilfrid Laurier University in 2005 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Kinesiology and Physical Education. She obtained her Diploma in Pedorthics from the University of Western Ontario and completed her National Certification in November 2007.

Jennifer serves on the Ethics Committee for The College of Pedorhics of Canada; she also continues to be an active supervisor to pedorthic candidates who are enrolled in the Pedorthic program through The University of Western Ontario.

In 2015, Jennifer was elected and currently serves on the Board of Directors for The College of Pedorthics of Canada.

In her spare time Jennifer enjoys hiking, DIY projects and cherishes every moment with her 2 children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sylvia Forgrave
 

Sylvia is co-owner of Mike Forgrave & Associates.  She is our business manager and "chief cook and bottle washer" meaning when needed she will help with all aspects of the business.  Sylvia received her degree in Honours Kinesiology and has a Bachelor of Education.  She also obtained the 4th level of her CMA (Certifed Management Accountant).

Sylvia competed internationally representing Canada in the 100m hurdles. This cumulated with her competeing in the 1984 Olympics where she placed 11th.  After she retired from competition Sylvia took up Volleyball where she became an Ontario All-Star.  In 2005, Sylvia was part of a slow-pitch team that won the Ontario Championships.

 

Sylvia's main enjoyment (besides the company of her husband Mike) is travelling.  This passion has taken her to all of the continents of the world, including Antarctica and the High Arctic of Norway.  When she is not travelling or working Sylvia volunteers for Athletics Canada as a team manager.

 

 


 

 

A Tribute to Mike Forgrave

By Brad Gibbs

 

Mike passed away in April 2015 and Brad wrote this tribute for Mike’s colleagues in Pedorthics.

 

 

I met Mike in 1988. He was doing what he did well, imparting wisdom to young and eager minds, about biomechanics and how to make people better, physically and in athletic performance.

 

I went up to him after his lecture, because I recognized that this was a wise man and what he was saying was exactly what I had been craving to hear… Validation that there was merit in what we did as pedorthists and that being creative, knowledgeable and thinking outside the box was how to be the best practitioner.

 

A year later, after having the odd conversation over phone or at an event, we met for lunch to discuss the possibility of partnering.

 

He was approaching the 5th year in his practice and I just entering my second. But we were fairly strong independent spirits and mutually agreed that we were not ready to let one another influence each other’s paths. For the next 23 years, Mike and I coexisted, I’d reach out to him for an opinion or advice and he’d readily give it, and Mike continued to do what he did best. He took his place without hesitation as a leader in the pedorthic profession.


He inspired, mentored and educated his fellow colleagues with his exemplary understanding and knowledge of biomechanics, his care for patients and his craftsmanship, creativity and ingenuity in creating foot orthotics.

 

He served as president of our American friends’ association, The Pedorthic Footwear Association, for 16 years. And he did it with such zeal and commitment, that at times he needed to look Forgrave up in the phone book to remember his wife’s name. For his volunteer service in the states, he received the Pedorthic Life Time Achievement Award.

 

He led the Clinical Practice task force of the Pedorthic Association of Canada, and assembled a team under him, including over 60 pedorthists across Canada, and kept them all on track to write a text book that is unprecedented, and sold around the world, in podiatry schools, chiropody, orthotic and prosthetic learning institutions and as a reference text for family physicians and orthopaedic surgeons.

 

Mike was also part of the Pedorthic team that treated athletes at the Summer Olympics in Athens.

 

He would regularly speak at both American and Canadian pedorthic events.

 

He received the Award of Excellence from the Pedorthic Association of Canada.

 

He served on the Pedorthic Association of Canada’s board of directors for the last couple years, and only resigned weeks before he passed.

 

Mike and I would see each other at various professional and industry events over the years, until in the spring of 2012 when we sat at a pub across the bay from Sydney Australia, talking about local craft beers, Australian spiders and merging once again.

 

At about the same time, Mike began working closely with Ryan Robinson on the PAC board. Mike and Ryan immediately understood that they shared a lot in common, especially with respect to their philosophies regarding our profession and business.

 

Ryan and Walking Mobility clinics were able to bring the three of us together and we became partners, officially, a year ago. The time was finally right.

 

Frustratingly, and sadly, at the same time he learned of his illness. Just days after learning he was in a battle for his life, he took me on the road with him to a clinic in Burlington. We drove, making small talk and when we arrived, and with what I know to be a heavy heart, he sighed, gathered himself and began his day. And with the spirit and resolve of an Olympic athlete, he really never stopped working at what he loved to do until less than 2 weeks before he left us. See patients, discover their problems and make their world better. And he never stopped thinking about what great things we could accomplish together, debating different ideas with me, vehemently opposing some, suggesting better, wiser ways for others, sharing a mutual vision, imparting the wisdom of his phenomenal 30 year career on me.

 

In the last year, I slowly got to know the person behind the quiet, often private, somewhat legendary, sometimes crusty man. I’m grateful to have known Mike far better than I ever would have.

 

On a personal level, he was an intelligent, vulnerable, emotional man who loved The Hobbit, travelling the world with his bride, with an equally irrational love for dogs to mine and a passion like my own, for treating people with foot pain or mobility issues and improving their lives.

 

Over his career he has treated thousands of people and hundreds of elite and famous athletes and I’m humbled to think that he held me in some esteem as someone worthy to carry on his legacy.